Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Crossing That Bridge When You Come To It

The title to my blog is easier said than done, isn't it?


At least, it is for me.

I think about the bridges I have to cross and I imagine potential bridges as well. I worry about the bridges and I fear the potential ones. I think about a lot of bridges in my life.

After telling his audience that seeking the Kingdom of God first would allow everything else to fall into place, Jesus then uttered these remarkable words:

"Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble." (Mat 6.34 ESV)

What astounds me most—by far—isn't that the Lord told us to focus on today instead of worrying about the future. What astounds me most is his unfettered truth that each day has trouble [KJV "evil"].

In his lexicon Joseph Thayer gives different glosses for κακια as

1. malignity, malice, ill-will, desire to injure
2. wickedness, depravity
2a. wickedness that is not ashamed to break laws
3. evil, trouble

We can't pray and fast away trouble. It comes to us daily in one form(s) or another. It's inevitable. It can be physical, relational or emotional. Pain is pain, troubles are troubles.

Adam Clarke, from his Commentary:

"Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof - Αρκετον τη ημερα η κακια αυτης, Sufficient for each day is its own calamity. Each day has its peculiar trials: we should meet them with confidence in God. As we should live but a day at a time, so we should take care to suffer no more evils in one day than are necessarily attached to it. He who neglects the present for the future is acting opposite to the order of God, his own interest, and to every dictate of sound wisdom. Let us live for eternity, and we shall secure all that is valuable in time."

Read this phrase from Clarke again: "He who neglects the present for the future is acting opposite to the order of God, his own interest, and to every dictate of sound wisdom."

It's literally sinful and anti-productive to worry about the future.

May I listen to the Master's words.